• Reduce the negative impacts of COVID-19 in Nepalese Tourism and Hospitality Industries 

    न्यूजलाईन्स् मिडिया संवाददाता
    प्रकाशित मिति : ८ मंसिर २०७७, सोमबार १०:०३

    Vilash Khatri– The decade 2020 started with a much unsettling and unfortunate occurrence of new disease in the line of over 30 novel infections that the world has experienced in past 30 years .This time the nomenclature given to the new severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak was the novel corona virus. Later termed COVID-19, the disease represented an atypical pneumonia that started in China, and later spread across nations’ the world over. Tourism Impacts: Tourism impacts can be grouped into three main categories: economic, social, and environmental. These impacts are analyzed using data gathered by businesses, governments, and industry organizations. The tourism industry is seen to be entering into a great crisis which is also establishing a stock market crash in all the sectors.  The tourism industry is seen to be facing the unprecedented threats as is seen in this context.

    The COVID-19 is raising a global health alarm which is establishing the healthcare instability as well as impacting the economic breakdown of the activities Economic Impacts. The severity of the corona virus has grown significant panic among the people across the globe. The people even fear to exit from their houses. When developed conscientiously, tourism can, and does, contribute to a positive quality of life for residents. However, as identified by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP, 2003a), negative social impacts of tourism can include: Change or loss of indigenous identity and values, Culture clashes, Physical causes of social stress (increased demand for resources), Ethical issues (such as an increase in sex tourism or the exploitation of child workers). High-end hotels, and airlines are severely going down because spreading of the coronavirus. Environmental Impacts Tourism relies on, and greatly impacts, the natural environment in which it operates. Even 61 though many areas of the world are conserved in the form of parks and protected areas, tourism development can have severe negative impacts. According to UNEP these can include: Depletion of natural resources (water, forests, etc.), Pollution (air pollution, noise, sewage, waste and littering), and Physical impacts (construction activities, marina development, trampling, loss of biodiversity).

    The environmental impacts of tourism can reach outside local areas and have an effect on the global ecosystem. One example is increased air travel, which is a major contributor to climate change. Whether positive or negative, tourism is a force for change around the world, and the industry is transforming at a staggering rate. But before we delve deeper into our understanding of tourism, let’s take a look at the development of the sector in our own backyard. Environmentally, tourism has provided protection to the natural environment through financial contribution from entrance fees and the maintenance and enhancement from government funding. The financial contribution from tourism has provided for the management and expansion of protected areas.

    The study entitled, Measures of post Corona virus pandemics in hospitality and tourism industries, and aims to find the impact of the occurrence of corona virus on the tourism industry in Nepal and its preventive measures. The objective of my article is to focus into the programmatic ideas to reduce the negative impacts of COVID-19 in Nepalese Tourism and Hospitality Industries. In conclusion the need of the hours is to function all stakeholders of this sector in collaborative and coordinated manner not only to mitigate the repercussions of this volatile pandemic but also to formulate short term, mid-term and long term plans to ease the recovery.

    Tourism is one of the most remarkable success stories of modern times. The industry, which began on a massive scale only in the 1960s, has grown rapidly and steadily for the past 30 years in terms of the income it generates and the number of people who travel abroad. It has proved to be resilient in times of economic crisis and shows no signs of slowing down, despite the uncertainty, caused by the events such as September 11, other terrorist threats, and even unexpected new illnesses like SARS in the beginning of the new century (Theobald, 2005). Many time dangerous than SARS COVID 19 is jeopardizing the world tourism. Many tourism related products and services are based only on the aforementioned existing natural or cultural/historic promise, most of which do not have acceptable marketing support in forms of 57 infrastructure, amenities, and digital communication to optimize the tourist experience, and to alert potential and actual tourists of the existence and nuances of those experiences .

    When asked what it would take to get them to travel again, most US leisure travelers want additional health and safety measures, according to the McKinsey Consumer Leisure Travel Survey, which surveyed 3,498 travelers from five countries in April 2020. No one measure, however, satisfies those queried. Survey participants were asked to select all the answers that applied, and respondents said, essentially, “yes”—they do not distinguish among the safety measures, and think these all are more or less valuable.

    As they ponder those results, many hotels are wondering what steps to take, in what order, to make their properties safe, and demonstrate that to reluctant customers. Some answers may be emerging from China, the first nation affected by the crisis, and the first one to start coming out of it. Leading Chinese hotels are deploying a range of health and hygiene measures that may be helpful as examples.

    Would you like to learn more about our Travel, Logistics & Transport Infrastructure Practice?

    Some Chinese hotels are fine-tuning their booking tools to remind customers about the restrictions in place, and hotels follow up with guests about those before they arrive. Upon check-in, some hotels require guests to provide proof (via a QR code) that they have not been in contact with infected people. Some also measure guests’ body temperature several times: at check-in, anytime they enter and exit the hotel during their stay, as well as upon their checkout. For Western hotels to adopt the same standards would of course require changes in government policy and public-health approaches.

    Chinese hotels have also instituted new cleaning processes. Some leading chains have also added touch less or contactless elements to the customer experience, including contactless checkouts via app or email, and robots to deliver food, beverages, and the like. Some operators are limiting food and beverage options to prepackaged meals, to be consumed inside guests’ rooms versus common restaurant or bar areas. Additional hotel amenities like gyms, spas, and laundry facilities may be closed. At the same time, many Chinese hotels have increasingly targeted their offerings toward the local population and those traveling within short distances—for example, by offering meal plans for locals, or weekend getaways for those who want to spend time outside the city or their apartments.

    Implications for travel and hospitality

    Travel will return. But the recovery will likely take longer than in other industries, and will vary across segments. Business and leisure travel will return at different paces, as will domestic and international travel. What’s certain is that the next normal will be marked by structural shifts, especially around customer expectations for hygiene and flexibility.

    For business travelers, demand will likely come back unevenly. Essential travel will differ by industry. According to executives and chief human resources officers in North America, interviewed in April 2020 across an array of industries, every one of their companies is using technology as a substitute for nonessential travel. Most expect that certain types of travel—like internal meetings—will never fully return to pre-COVID-19 levels.

    Companies say they plan to turn off their travel restrictions in phases, and are developing decision-making processes and more agile travel policies to account for safety before authorizing travel. Client-facing visits such as site visits and sales calls are likely to return first. Day trips and self-drive travel are likely to return earlier since physical-distancing measures, exposure, and risk will be more manageable. Conferences and industry events will likely be the last to return.

    In leisure, we expect that travel to visit friends and relatives will return first, likely by car. Travel restrictions combined with economic uncertainty will likely translate into a higher share of domestic and close-to-home travel. Longer international leisure trips will be slow to return, and travelers will expect greater flexibility in cancelation and change fees. The recovery may include extremely short planning cycles driven by gradual lifts of the travel restrictions and very short booking windows as travelers monitor the situation.

    Recent trends in China may offer a glimpse of the weeks ahead for US travelers. As domestic travel in China slowly returns, cautious travelers prefer to stay close to home, either driving or taking trains to regional destinations.

    Hotels face the prospect of a long recovery. Over the coming months and years, properties’ circumstances will vary based on a number of factors, including chain scale, location, and demand profile. There is no one right response for everyone, but some guidelines apply universally. Hotels must care for their employees, staying engaged with them through the pandemic and keeping them safe when they return. They must manage customer expectations, recognize that these will continue to evolve, and prepare to act agilely to address health and safety concerns. And they must revise their commercial strategy for the restart, with an eye toward the next normal. In the long term, travel will return because of an important shift in consumption—an accelerated pivot from buying things to buying experiences.

    I hope my opinion in this article stimulate your thinking positive about your recovering your business and we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Now the next measure challenging is about the lack of Job in this pandemic. People are jobless and seeking for employment.

    Today: High vacancy

    COVID-19 is a challenge to both our lives and livelihoods. The crisis is unprecedented and moving quickly, yet still deeply uncertain.

    To put parameters around that uncertainty, I created nine potential scenarios for recovery of national economies, based on the extent to which the pandemic spread is controlled, as well as the effectiveness of economic policies intended to counter the effects of quarantine.

    On the hotel front, I analyzed the long-term historical relationship between industry performance and economic data. There is variation across chain scales (from luxury to economy), but I found the strongest relationship between changes in revenue per available room (RevPAR) and the unemployment rate. Based on this relationship, I used the unemployment rate projections from our colleagues to set a baseline for hotel performance. I then adjusted the baseline to account for additional impacts of COVID-19, factoring in the likely length of shelter-in-place restrictions, changes in company travel policies, consumer sentiment and willingness to travel, and structural changes to demand, such as videoconferences instead of in-person events.

    In scenario, the virus’s spread is contained, and the economy recovers slowly, revenue per available hotel room (RevPAR) falls by 53 percent in 2020, and returns to very near pre-crisis levels in 2022.

    The study entitled, Measures of post Corona virus pandemics in hospitality and tourism industries, and aims to find the impact of the occurrence of corona virus on the tourism industry in Nepal and its preventive measures. The objective of my article is to focus into the programmatic ideas to reduce the negative impacts of COVID-19 in Nepalese Tourism and Hospitality Industries. In conclusion the need of the hours is to function all stakeholders of this sector in collaborative and coordinated manner not only to mitigate the repercussions of this volatile pandemic but also to formulate short term, mid-term and long term plans to ease the recovery.

    Academic Director-Explore Institute of Hotel Management

    An International Life Skills Trainer

    Hospitality Master Trainer

    Human Mechanism(phycology) Lecturer

    फेसबुक प्रतिक्रिया
    सम्बन्धित शीर्षकहरु